Modal model theory

I would like to share with you a brief description of what I have been doing at Oxford for the past eight months. Since my adviser has already written about our work on his Twitter and blog multiple times, I have decided to embed several tweets pertaining to our project and comment on them. Let […]

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A half-pie ratio

Allow me to tell you about an interesting construction I learned from the Stewart’s Calculus book. Start with a square of area one. Next, extend your current rectangle, alternately, on top or beside, by another rectangle of area one. The first 500 steps of this construction are shown below. If you watch the animation carefully, you […]

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Liar’s Paradox

This was a talk for “Academic English: Spoken Communication 2” that I gave last Thursday. Please note that this presentation was aimed for non-mathematicians and non-philosophers. Thus, I concealed any anxiety about the topic for clarity’s sake. There is a short clip on the second slide and a GIF on the third one. Unfortunately, these […]

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University of Oxford

I shall take up a place as a Recognised Student in the Faculty of Philosophy at the University of Oxford starting 7th January 2019. I shall be undertaking research on the topic of “the philosophical consequences of recent advancements in ‘Multiverse inspired mathematics.” My academic adviser will be Professor Joel David Hamkins. I anticipate this […]

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Chaos​ does not always prevail

One of the first astonishments I faced as an undergraduate mathematics student was that chaos prevails. What do I mean by that? Well, there are more irrational numbers than rational numbers, there are more non-computable functions than computable, and, finally, there are more continuous functions devoid of a derivative than those which have one. In the […]

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